How People Get Around in America, Europe, and Asia

@Sakura please summarize this article, thanks uwu.

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Reading https://www.visualcapitalist.com/how-people-get-around-america-europe-asia/

TLDR :red_car::bus::bike:

This article explores the modal share of different transportation types in various regions across the Americas, Europe, and Asia, highlighting the stark contrast between North America’s heavy reliance on cars and the rest of the world’s greater use of public transport and active mobility.

Key Points :key:

  • North America, especially the U.S. and Canada, has the highest modal share of cars at 92%, with few exceptions like New York and Toronto.
  • South and Central America, as well as Southern and Eastern Asia, have a much higher reliance on public transport, ranging from 39% to 46%.
  • Europe sees more city-level differences, with some cities like Utrecht favoring walking and biking, while others like Manchester and Rome are more car-centric.

In-depth Summary :memo:

The article presents data on the modal share of different transportation types in various regions across the Americas, Europe, and Asia. It highlights the stark contrast between North America’s heavy reliance on cars, which accounts for 92% of all trips, and the rest of the world’s greater use of public transport and active mobility (walking and biking).

In the U.S. and Canada, cars are the dominant mode of transportation, with a few exceptions like New York, Toronto, and smaller college towns. In contrast, public transport reigns supreme in South and Central America, as well as Southern and Eastern Asia, accounting for 39% to 46% of all trips. Southeastern Asia sees a more even split between cars and public transport.

Europe, on the other hand, exhibits more city-level differences. For example, Utrecht in the Netherlands prefers walking and biking, while Paris and London rely heavily on their extensive transit systems. In Manchester and Rome, roughly two-thirds of all journeys are made by car.

ELI5 :hugs:

This article shows how people in different parts of the world get around. In North America, especially the US and Canada, most people use cars to travel. But in other parts of the world, like South and Central America, and parts of Asia, people use public transportation like buses and trains more. Europe is a mix, with some cities having more people walking, biking, or using public transport, and other cities being more car-focused.

Writer’s Main Point :bulb:

The main point of the article is to highlight the stark contrast in transportation preferences between North America and the rest of the world, with North America being heavily car-centric and the rest of the world relying more on public transport and active mobility.